Western value considerations in gambling with a comparison to North American aboriginal views
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Western value considerations in gambling with a comparison to North American aboriginal views by Francis R. Guth

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Published by Centre for Northern Ontario Development Studies in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Gambling -- Moral and ethical aspects.,
  • Lotteries -- Moral and ethical aspects.,
  • Indian ethics.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Francis R. Guth.
SeriesResearch report -- 94-1
ContributionsAlgoma University College., Centre for Northern Ontario Development Studies.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHV"6710"G88"1994
The Physical Object
Pagination39 p
Number of Pages39
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20805580M

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North American Aboriginal peoples are estimated to experience gambling problems at about two to three times higher than the general population (Belanger ; Wardman et al. ). Similarly, Stevens and Young (b) reported a national gambling prevalence rate for Australian Aboriginal gamblers . different. For Aboriginal people it is important that children know their `connections', who their relatives are. Western language has a focus on `naming' things. First Mum and Dad and immediate family, but then favourite objects and anything in the environment, onto colours, counting etc, Teaching without awareness or worse, deliberately, from ourFile Size: KB. To explore your world view further and how it has been formed, try this activity, made by an Aboriginal researcher in Australia. After watching the video about water, have a look at the conflict over water that has been going on in North Dakota, USA. To change health inequities, researchers have recognized the need to build true partnerships with communities.1 Indigenous communities and researchers have voiced a variety of concerns with “research as usual” and emphasized the value of true partnerships, including decolonizing research to instill a balance between Indigenous and Western frameworks and methods.2–4 We use a case study of Cited by:

  In doing this, I will use a typical Western method of contrasting the Indigenous and Western world views through a series of theoretical dichotomies. It would be challenging – and probably impossible for me as a Westerner – to try to approach this from an indigenous point of view and express it in an indigenous style. The legalization of gambling in Canada, the development of high-stakes gambling by some American Indian tribes, and the acceptance of the aims of self-government, nation building, and economic development for Aboriginal people provided the context within which Aboriginal high-stakes gambling could be pursued and developed in : John McCready.   The western development paradigm has brought a range of decision issues never contemplated in the Aboriginal societies of the past. Under Aboriginal customary law, decisions about land and natural resources were encased in a complex (and locally differing) set of rules and social norms, given spiritual and temporal force by the "Dreaming" sets.   Gambling is very common in many Aboriginal communities but little data exists. Aboriginal people gamble for the same reasons as other Australians: because they are bored, to be entertained, to win money, to meet other people, to reduce stress, and. because they like the thrill of a game.

  North American Aboriginal peoples are estimated to experience gambling problems at about 2–3 times higher than the general population (Belanger ; Wardman et al. ). Similarly, Stevens and Young (b) reported a national gambling prevalence rate for Australian Aboriginal gamblers as %.Cited by: Aboriginal Gambling and Problem Gambling: A Review 4 These definitions are based on Western gambling concepts however Williams et al. () maintain that the construct of problem/pathological gambling has some cross- Gambling among many North American Aboriginal people has been, and for some is,.,, (,,,,.., Cited by: Francis R. Guth has written: 'Western value considerations in gambling with a comparison to North American aboriginal views' -- subject(s): Gambling, Indian ethics, Lotteries, Moral and ethical.   This literature review attempts to: estimate Aboriginal population prevalence rates for problem and pathological gambling and compare these rates to the general population; determine factors associated with the Aboriginal population problem gambling behaviour; and identify other salient findings and issues. Materials used in the review were drawn from available research literature and Cited by: